Word 2010 Masterclass – Multiple Columns

Multiple Columns TitleWanting to ‘jazz up’ your boring old Microsoft Word documents?

If your answer is “Yes”, then here is a very quick and simple idea for achieving the look of a newspaper article.

The vast majority of newspaper articles are laid out in a multiple column format and this effect is possible to create with just a few clicks of your mouse.

Interested? Then, here goes.

You can download a sample word document >>here<<, in Word 2010 format, to accompany these instructions.

Ensure a suitable document is open.

word004_01

Go to the Page Layout ribbon bar and in the Page Setup section, click on the Columns icon.

Select Two from the drop-down list (shown right).

View your results.

Go back to the Page Layout ribbon bar and in the Page Setup section, click on the Columns icon.

Select Three, this time, from the drop-down list.

View your results.

Experiment by repeating the steps above and then selecting Left and then Right respectively to see what results you can get.

Below is the downloaded document (first page only) with the three column layout applied.

3 Column Layout Document

This is the end of our Word 2010 – Multiple Columns masterclass.

Please use the comments box below to let us know what you think of our blogs.

Bob Thomson is an IT professional with over 20 years experience in the industry having worked as a Consultant, Director, Manager and Trainer. He has vast experience using Microsoft software packages as an individual and in businesses situations.

Bob Thomson
Owner / Managing Director
Real Options

Word 2010 Masterclass – Working With Tables (Part 3)

Working with Tables 3 Graphic
Welcome to Part 3 of our three-part masterclass on working with tables. In Part 1 we discussed what tables are, when we use them and then described the different methods of creating them. In Part 2 we covered inserting and deleting rows and columns and merging and splitting cells. In this part, we will go on to text alignment, borders and shading and table styles.

If you missed Part 1, you can go to it now by clicking >>here<<.

If you missed Part 2, you can go to it now by clicking >>here<<.

If you’re happy, let’s go on with Part 3.

In order to save time, you can download a sample table >>here<<, in Word 2010 format, to accompany these instructions. This is a copy of the table that we created in Part 2.

NB: If the document comes up in Protected View you need to click the Enable Editing button.

If you are now able to edit the document, we can get on with the lesson.

Text Alignment

Word graphic

You can align text both vertically and horizontally in order to enhance and improve your tables.

Highlight the titles row (Model, Reg No, Colour etc.).

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Layout sub-section is highlighted.

Go to the Alignment section and click on the Align Center icon (shown right and highlighted in orange).

Now, highlight the Agila and Corsa titles and repeat the Align Center process with them.

Borders & Shading

Before we get on to the borders and shading options, let’s make a few text changes.

Highlight the Stock List title and change it to a bright red colour, size 14 and bold.

Highlight all the other titles and make them yellow.

Word 2010 graphic

Select the entire table.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Design sub-section is highlighted.

Go to the Draw Borders section (shown left).

Word 2010 graphic

Change the Pen Color to red and the Line Weight to 1½ points (as shown).

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Design sub-section is still highlighted.

In the Table Styles section, click on the down arrow, immediately to the right of the Borders icon.

In the dialogue box that appears, select Outside Borders (shown right).

This should create a thick red border around the outside of our table.

Select the row containing the Stock List title.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Design sub-section is still highlighted.

In the Table Styles section, click on the down arrow, immediately to the right of the Shading icon.

Select black as the shading option.

Now, select the title row underneath the black row we just created.

Use the same technique, but this time select a dark grey shade.

Select the two car titles and make them the same dark grey.

Finally, select all the text cells and colour them light grey.

The final table is shown below.

Word 2010 graphic

Table Styles

If you want to spruce up a table, and you don’t need the control that we have exercised so far, you can apply a quick style to your table.

Select the entire table.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Design sub-section is highlighted.

In the Table Styles section, select one of the pre-formatted styles.

You will see a preview of the styles as you hover your mouse over them.

When you see the style you want to apply, left-click the option.

This is now the end of the final part of our Working With Tables masterclass.
>>click here to go to Part 2<<
or
>>click here to go back to Part 1<<.

Please use the comments box below to let us know what you think of our blogs.

Bob Thomson is an IT professional with over 20 years experience in the industry having worked as a Consultant, Director, Manager and Trainer. He has vast experience using Microsoft software packages as an individual and in businesses situations.

Bob Thomson
Owner / Managing Director
Real Options

Word 2010 Masterclass – Working With Tables (Part 2)

Word 2010 Graphic
Welcome to Part 2 of our three-part masterclass on working with tables. In Part 1 we discussed what tables are, when we use them and then described the different methods of creating them. In this part, we will talk about some of the things we can do to improve our tables.

If you missed Part 1, you can go to it now by clicking >>here<<.

If you have already looked at Part 1 or are confident of creating tables in Word 2010, read on.

In order to save time, you can download a sample table >>here<<, in Word 2010 format, to accompany these instructions.

NB: If the document comes up in Protected View you need to click the Enable Editing button.

If you are now able to edit the document, we can get on with the lesson.

Make yourself comfortable and let’s go.

Inserting and Deleting Rows/Columns

Click anywhere in the Reg No column of the table.

Word 2010 graphic

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Layout sub-section is highlighted (as above).

Click on the Insert Right icon in the Rows & Columns section.

The new column appears.

Name the column Colour.

Add the car colours (from top to bottom) Black, White, Blue, White, White, Silver.

Click anywhere in the top row of the table.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Layout sub-section is still highlighted.

Click on the Insert Above icon in the Rows & Columns section.

The new row appears.

Word 2010 graphic

To delete rows and columns, click anywhere in the row or column you want to delete.

For example, let’s say we have sold the Blue Agila. Click inside this row.

Again, go to the Table Tools ribbon bar and the Layout sub-section.

Click on the down arrow of the Delete icon in the Rows & Columns section (shown left) and select Delete Row.

The row has gone.

Merging/Splitting Cells

Word 2010 graphic

Now let’s look at merging and splitting cells.

Highlight the cells as shown right.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Layout sub-section is highlighted.

Click on the Merge Cells icon in the Merge section.

This has merged the selected cells together.

Now, do the same with the whole of the top row.

Once done, put in a title Stock List in the new merged row.

Imagine now that we made a mistake and not all our vehicles are Agilas. We can split the Agila cell that we created a while ago.

Select the Agila cell again.

In the Table Tools ribbon bar make sure the Layout sub-section is highlighted once more.

Click on the Split Cells icon in the Merge section.

In the dialogue box that appears, change the number of columns to 1 and the number of rows to 5.

Click OK.

Now, merge the top three cars as Agilas and the bottom two cars as Corsas.

Your finished table should look like the one below.

Word 2010 graphic

This is now the end of Part 2 of our Working With Tables masterclass.

>>click here to go to Part 3<<
or
>>click here to go back to Part 1<<.

Please use the comments box below to let us know what you think of our blogs.

Bob Thomson is an IT professional with over 20 years experience in the industry having worked as a Consultant, Director, Manager and Trainer. He has vast experience using Microsoft software packages as an individual and in businesses situations.

Bob Thomson
Owner / Managing Director
Real Options

Word 2010 Masterclass – Working With Tables (Part 1)

Word 2012 Graphic
You can create tables very easily in all versions of Microsoft Word and it is no different in Word 2010.

In this, the first of a three-part masterclass on working with tables, we discuss what tables are and when we use them. We then describe the different methods of creating tables. In Part 2, we will talk about some of the things we can do to improve our tables and continue this in Part 3.

If you can already create tables in Microsoft Word you can >>click here to go direct to Part 2<<.

Introduction

Tables are used when you want to present information in an organised, interesting and easy-to-read format. They are ideal for forms, side-by-sde lists, basic spreadsheets (using minor calculations) etc.

A table consists of rows and columns that form boxes where they cross. These boxes are called cells and they can hold text, graphics and other content. The cells expand vertically to fit the amount of text or the height of the graphic you place in them.

Creating a Table

There are a number of ways to create tables in Microsoft Word:

  • Selecting from a grid
  • Specifying the number of columns and rows
  • Drawing the table by hand
  • Converting tabbed text
  • Pre-formatted table

All these methods are available on the Insert ribbon bar in the Tables section.

1. Selecting from a grid

Go to the Insert ribbon bar and in the Tables section, click on the Table icon.

You will now see the dialogue box (shown below).

Word 2010 Graphic

Click in the small box in the top left of the grid and drag to select the number of columns and rows you require (shown in the highlighted red box). When you have the correct number, left-click the last box. In the diagram, I have selected 6 columns and 4 rows.

You will now have the table you require displayed.

2. Specifying the number of columns and rows

Again, go to the Insert ribbon bar and in the Tables section, click on the Table icon.

Word 2010 Graphic

This time click where it says Insert Table… .

The Insert Table dialogue box (shown right) will appear.

Enter the number of columns and the number of rows you require in the relevant boxes. I selected 5 columns and 5 rows.

Click OK.

The new table, with the selected number of columns and rows will have appeared.

3. Drawing the table by hand

NB. This is an advanced technique and requires a bit of practice.

Again, go to the Insert ribbon bar and in the Tables section, click on the Table icon.

Click where it says Draw Table… .

Word 2010 Graphic

The cursor has changed to a pencil.

Draw a rectangle to define the external boundaries of the table.

A new Table Tools ribbon bar has appeared.

You can now draw column and row lines inside the rectangle you created.

You an see my masterpiece above including diagonal lines.

Word 2010 Graphic

If you want to delete a line or a group of lines, go to the Table Tools ribbon bar and in the Draw Borders section, click on the Eraser icon (shown right).

Click on the lines that you want to erase. When you are finished, click the Draw Table icon in the Draw Borders section to continue drawing the table.

As an alternative, you can distribute the rows and/or columns evenly.

4. Converting tabbed text

This is useful if you have some text in columns seperated by tabs.

Word 2010 Graphic

First of all, highlight your text and I am sure you know by now, go to the Insert ribbon bar and in the Tables section, click on the Convert Text to Table icon (shown left).

The Convert Text to Table dialogue box will appear.

Check the number of columns and rows and click OK.

5. Pre-formatted table

Word 2010 Graphic

For the last time, go to the Insert ribbon bar and in the Tables section, click on the Quick Tables icon.

The Quick Tables dialogue box appears (shown right).

Click on the table you would like and it will appear.

You can edit it to your heart’s desire.

This is now the end of Part 1 of our Working With Tables masterclass.
>>click here to go to Part 2<<
or
>>click here to go to Part 3<<.

Please use the comments box below to let us know what you think of our blogs.

Bob Thomson is an IT professional with over 20 years experience in the industry having worked as a Consultant, Director, Manager and Trainer. He has vast experience using Microsoft software packages as an individual and in businesses situations.

Bob Thomson
Owner / Managing Director
Real Options

Word 2010 Masterclass – Table of Contents

Table of Contents Graphic
If you have ever tried to manually add a Table of Contents to the beginning of a Word document you will know how difficult and time consuming it can be. It’s even worse when you try to alter it after making changes to the document.

Microsoft Word has a Table of Contents function, precisely to fit and overcome this problem. Follow the simple steps in this blog and you can easily take your documents to the next level.

In order to assist you, you can download a sample Word document >>here<<, in Word 2010 format, to accompany these instructions.

General

As we have just said, Microsoft Word 2010 can automatically create a Table of Contents for you. The easiest way for this to happen, is to use Header Styles within the document.

For each section and sub-section of your document you will mark the respective headings with H1, H2 and/or H3 styles, a process that we will discuss in detail in a little while.

Word 2010 Graphic

When we prepare the Table of Contents in this manner, the table will automatically update itself to reflect any changes you make within your document making it a really quick and painless process.

You can use the default styles that have been set up for the headings, which would be the quickest option, or you can edit the styles so that they fit with any corporate fonts and/or colours you may want. This next section deals with editing the heading styles.

Modifying Heading Styles

Word 2010 Graphic

Ensure you have the Home ribbon bar selected and go to the Styles section.

Locate the Heading 2 icon in this section and click your right-hand mouse button on it.

This should bring up the dialogue box as in the diagram to the right.

Select the Modify option in the dialogue box to bring up the Modify Styles box as shown below.

This is where we will make the changes we want.

Word 2010 Graphic

There are many changes we can make to our styles here but, for now, we will just change the font, font-size and font colour.

About one third of the way down you will see the sub-heading Formatting. Directly underneath this you will see the options to change the options I suggest.

I made the following changes:

Font: Verdana
Size: 14
Colour: Red

You make your own changes.

When your modifications are done, click OK.

Repeat these stages for the Heading 3 style.

Bear in mind that your Heading 3 style should not be more prominent than your Heading 2 style, otherwise your finished document will just look really wierd.

Applying The Styles

Highlight the paragraph title Behaviour and select the Heading 2 style.

Do the same for the following paragraph titles:
A Practical Example
Attitude
Appearance
Assertiveness

Highlight the sub-paragraph title Uniform and select the Heading 3 style.

Do the same for the following sub-paragraph titles:
Uniform
Shoes
Socks/Stockings
Jewellery
Hair
Personal Hygiene
Nails
Tattoos
Shaving
Make Up

We have now prepared the document and made it ready to complete the Table of Contents process.

Adding the Table of Contents

Word 2010 Graphic

Open the References ribbon bar.

On the extreme left you will find the Table of Contents icon in the Table of Contents section.

Click on this icon to bring up the dialogue box (left).

You can select one of the Automatic Tables that are shown in this box if you want a quick option.

Select the Insert Table of Contents option to display the Table of Contents dialogue box (shown below).

Word 2010 Graphic

In this box you must ensure the Table of Contents tab is selected.

Ensure the Show page numbers box is selected.

Ensure the Right align page numbers box is selected.

Select dots in the Tab leader box.

In the Formats box, select one of the pre-formatted options. I chose Distinctive.

Click OK.

You now have a Table of Contents but to finish it off, I like to add a Page Break after the table so that is has a page to itself.

I hope you found this useful.

Bob Thomson is an IT professional with over 20 years experience in the industry having worked as a Consultant, Director, Manager and Trainer. He has vast experience using Microsoft software packages as an individual and in businesses situations.

He is also the Group Manager of the East Ayrshire Business Forum on LinkedIn.

Bob Thomson
Owner / Managing Director
Real Options